OUR THOUGHTS ON:

Where Is All My Cash?

Automobile

By Jason Pierce

You submit your dealer financial statements to the manufacturer and feel pretty good about the net income you generated during the reporting period.  Then you notice your cash balance is considerably low.  How could this be, given the net income you generated?

One of the most useful management tools to assess the overall financial position of the dealership is a cash flow statement.  The cash flow statement will outline what happened to your cash during the reporting period between operating, investing and financing activities.  The statement does so by starting with your net income (or loss) and adjusting it to the cash basis of accounting by evaluating the changes in assets and liabilities such as accounts receivable, inventory and floorplan from the beginning of the reporting period to the end of the reporting period. 

So, which balance sheet line items go in operating, investing and financing activities?  As a general rule of thumb, investing activities include purchases and sales of fixed assets and investments.  Financing activities include payments and borrowings on debt obligations and activity within net worth, including capital contributions and distributions.  Operating activities include other “operating” type line items, including accounts receivable, inventory, accounts payable and floorplan.  Also within the operating activity, net income is adjusted for income statement activity that is not a cash activity, such as depreciation and changes in the LIFO reserve. 

Once you have assembled the statement, you should analyze it and ask yourself questions, such as:  Where did we use our cash?  Are operating activities showing a positive cash flow?  Do the fluctuations in inventory and floorplan have a direct correlation?  Are capital projects burning a lot of cash?  Are distributions causing cash levels to be low?  Did we pay off some debt?  By answering questions such as these and reviewing the cash flow statement, you should have a better picture to what happened to the dealership’s cash during the period.

For more information, please contact Jason Pierce.

© 2014 Schneider Downs. All rights-reserved. All content on this site is property of Schneider Downs unless otherwise noted and should not be used without written permission.

This advice is not intended or written to be used for, and it cannot be used for, the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties that may be imposed, or for promoting, marketing or recommending to another person, any tax related matter.

You’ve heard our thoughts… We’d like to hear yours

The Schneider Downs Our Thoughts On blog exists to create a dialogue on issues that are important to organizations and individuals. While we enjoy sharing our ideas and insights, we’re especially interested in what you may have to say. If you have a question or a comment about this article – or any article from the Our Thoughts On blog – we hope you’ll share it with us. After all, a dialogue is an exchange of ideas, and we’d like to hear from you. Email us at contactSD@schneiderdowns.com.

Material discussed is meant for informational purposes only, and it is not to be construed as investment, tax, or legal advice. Please note that individual situations can vary. Therefore, this information should be relied upon when coordinated with individual professional advice.

© 2018 Schneider Downs. All rights-reserved. All content on this site is property of Schneider Downs unless otherwise noted and should not be used without written permission.

comments